Student Screencasting with the iPad

From ETEC 510
Jump to: navigation, search

Authored by Victoria Olson & D'Alice Marsh (March 2014)



Screencasting (or screen capture) is the video recording of the screen of an electronic device, which can be enhanced by simultaneous audio recordings, annotations, texts, and/or images. [1][2][3][4] Screencasting is typically used as a technical presentation tool, often to train or enhance a specific skill set or content knowledge.[5][6]


Purpose in Education

History
Screencasting in education has predominantly been teacher-centred in nature, particularly with the emergence of the flipped classroom model.[7] Instructors utilize screen capture technologies to offer their lecture materials in video format, allowing for an increasingly accessible curriculum. Though its use most has been popular in online learning, distance education, and higher education circles,[8] this practice has begun to saturate K-12 educational environments.[9][10]


Teacher-Centred Viewpoints
Screencasting can be used as a direction instruction tool in a flipped classroom or as a learning support in classrooms that support blended learning.[11][12] Using screencasting as a teacher-centred tool assumes that the learner is motivated to seek the transfer of knowledge.[13] The student can watch, rewind, and replay aspects of a lesson that they have difficulty with.

A popular teacher-centred screencasting series is Khan Academy, developed by Salman Khan in 2006, where mathematics instruction is featured from its most foundational levels up to advanced calculus.[14]


Learner-Centred Viewpoints
Students can construct and reflect on their own content knowledge and thinking using screencasting. Instructors use this method to promote metacognition,[15][16] particularly when solving problems or explaining a procedure. By documenting logic on a screencast, a student has created visible thinking and learning. The learner and instructor may then assess the work by replaying, discussing, and building upon prior knowledge. Digital growth portfolios can result from screencasting being used in this fashion.


Student Use in the Classroom

Lesson Design
Every student screencasting product can be inherently different and unique for each user. Screencasts can be created to outline a process, to present material, to capture reading, to share thinking relevant to content, or to reflect on learning.[17][18] Through the replay of the recording, students and/or their teacher can assess and provide next steps for personalized instruction. The constructivist nature of this method is inherent as students become increasingly metacognitive about their learning.[19][20]

In order to design an effective lesson or project that includes screencasting, teachers need to put students at the center of their own learning. By using detailed, yet open-ended criteria, students can create works that are reflective of their abilities in the content area.[21][22] The screencast might require the student to do research, to listen and re-record, or to include other multimedia to support their thinking, such as images, videos, text, or annotations.


Lesson Implementation and Assessment
Screencasts may be used in the classroom as a hook to review previous materials, to demonstrate current understandings, or to demonstrate learning as an evaluative assessment.[23][24] This can be implemented by way of assigning the recordings of screencasts as supplemental supports to the lesson as evidence of the learning process or as a final, evaluative project.

Alternatively, screencasting can be used to promote students’ assessment of their own work or the work of others,[25] as they set out to improve upon their knowledge in the content area.[26][27] Students reflect on the thinking process that they use to solve a given problem or to explain a specific procedure. While watching the screencast they have created, students are able to identify and evaluate their areas of strength and weakness, providing them the opportunity to correct their errors. Peer mentorship and collaboration is encouraged as students work to improve initial versions of their document through revision and amendments.[28]

Instructors can provide personalized supports for students based on the results of screencasts, as this work will have provided them with anecdotal evidence that they can playback and review with the student.[29][30][31] Individual action plans and goal setting for learning can be created as a result of these discussions between instructor and learner.[32]

iPad Applications and Features (Table)

Explain Everything Doceri               Educreations ShowMe Teach Ask3                 Screenchomp     
ExplainEverything(1).png Doceri.png Educreation.JPG ShowMe.jpg Knowmia Teach.png Ask3.png ScreenChomp.png
Cost $2.99 Free Free Free Free Free Free
Account Required No No No (but limits class option) No
Platform for Sharing No No No No
Follow No No No No No No
Multiple Platform For Viewing Only No No No No
Class Account No No ✓ - $5/month No
Choice of Resolution No No No No No No
Importing Existing Images
Existing Video No No No No No No
Existing Audio No No No No No No
PDF No No No No No No
from Web No No No No
New Image No
New Video No No No No No No
Exporting to Camera Roll (device) No No No No
Dropbox No No No No No
Google Drive No No No No
Google+ No No No No No No No
YouTube No No No No No
Email No No
iTunes No No No No No No
Evernote No No No No No No
WebDAV No No No No No No
box No No No No No
SkyDrive No No No No No No
vimeo No No No No No No
SkoleTube No No No No No No
Facebook No No No No No
Twitter No No No No
Lesson Link No No No No No
Export as PDF File No No No No No
XLP No No No No No No
MP4 No No No No
Video File No No No No No
Image File No No No No No
Audio Recording Simultaneously
Independently No No No No No No
Video Recording Screen
Screen & iPad Camera No No No No No
Pause
Eraser Whole Screen No
Individual Items No No No No No
Portion of an Item No No No
Undo No
Redo No No No
Ink No No No No No
Recording No No No No No
Pen Width No No No
Colour
Text No No No No
Font No
Size
Colour No
Laser Pointer No No No No No
Background Patterns No No No No
Draw Shapes No No No
Colour
Size
Readjustable No No No
Lines
Circles
Triangles No No No
Squares
Arrows
Rectangles No No No
Stars No No No
Slides Single
Multiple No No
Transitions No No No No No No No

References

  1. Bhatt, I. & de Roock, R. (2013). Capturing the sociomateriality of digital literary events. Research in Learning Technologies. 21(21281). http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/rlt.v21.21281
  2. Loch, B., McLoughlin, C. (2011, December). An instructional design model for screencasting: Engaging students in self-regulated learning. Ascilite 2011. Lecture conducted from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Retrieved from: http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/hobart11/downloads/papers/Loch-concise.pdf
  3. Ruffini, M.F. (2012). Screencasting to engage learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/screencasting-engage-learning
  4. Olson, V. (Author & Producer). (2013, November 25). Screencasting on the iPad for Visible Learning & Teaching. [iTunes U course]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/ca/course/screencasting-for-visible/id765141258
  5. PC Magazine Encyclopedia. (2014). Definition of: Screencast. PC Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/60127/screencast
  6. Olson, V. (2013). Screecasting and the SAMR Model [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOoGUOODttA
  7. Ruffini, M.F. (2012). Screencasting to engage learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/screencasting-engage-learning
  8. Loch, B., McLoughlin, C. (2011, December). An instructional design model for screencasting: Engaging students in self-regulated learning. Ascilite 2011. Lecture conducted from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Retrieved from: http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/hobart11/downloads/papers/Loch-concise.pdf
  9. Richards, R. (2012). Screencasting: Exploring a middle school math teacher’s beliefs and practices through the use of multimedia technology. International Journal of Instructional Media, 39(1), 55-67.
  10. Ruffini, M.F. (2012). Screencasting to engage learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/screencasting-engage-learning
  11. Ruffini, M.F. (2012). Screencasting to engage learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/screencasting-engage-learning
  12. Olson, V. (Author & Producer). (2013, November 25). Screencasting on the iPad for Visible Learning & Teaching. [iTunes U course]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/ca/course/screencasting-for-visible/id765141258
  13. von Glasersfeld, E. (2010). Ernst von Glasersfeld on teaching and radical constructivism [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YozoZxblQx8
  14. Khan Academy. (2014, March 4). In Wikipedia. Retrieved March 7, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khan_Academy
  15. Thompson, R. & Lee, M.J. (2012). Talking with students through screencasting: Experimentations with video feedback to improve student learning. The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. (1). Retrieved from http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/talking-with-students-through-screencasting-experimentations-with-video-feedback-to-improve-student-learning/
  16. Olson, V. (Author & Producer). (2013, November 25). Screencasting on the iPad for Visible Learning & Teaching. [iTunes U course]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/ca/course/screencasting-for-visible/id765141258
  17. Ruffini, M.F. (2012). Screencasting to engage learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved from: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/screencasting-engage-learning
  18. PC Magazine Encyclopedia. (2014). Definition of: Screencast. PC Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/60127/screencast
  19. Good, R., Mellon, E. K., & Krombout, R. A. (1978). The work of Jean Piaget. Journal of Chemical Engineering, 55, 688-693.
  20. Lutz, S. & Huit, W. (2003). Information processing and memory: Theory and applications. Educational Psychology Interactive. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved [February 5, 2014], from http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/papers/infoproc.pdf
  21. Lutz, S. & Huit, W. (2003). Information processing and memory: Theory and applications. Educational Psychology Interactive. Valdosta, GA: Valdosta State University. Retrieved [February 5, 2014], from http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/papers/infoproc.pdf
  22. Loch, B., McLoughlin, C. (2011, December). An instructional design model for screencasting: Engaging students in self-regulated learning. Ascilite 2011. Lecture conducted from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Retrieved from: http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/hobart11/downloads/papers/Loch-concise.pdf
  23. Richards, R. (2012). Screencasting: Exploring a middle school math teacher’s beliefs and practices through the use of multimedia technology. International Journal of Instructional Media, 39(1), 55-67.
  24. Loch, B., McLoughlin, C. (2011, December). An instructional design model for screencasting: Engaging students in self-regulated learning. Ascilite 2011. Lecture conducted from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Retrieved from: http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/hobart11/downloads/papers/Loch-concise.pdf
  25. Richards, R. (2012). Screencasting: Exploring a middle school math teacher’s beliefs and practices through the use of multimedia technology. International Journal of Instructional Media, 39(1), 55-67.
  26. Anderson, T. (2008). Towards a theory of online learning. In T. Anderson & F. Elloumi (eds.) Theory and Practice of Online Learning, Chapter 2 (pp. 45-74).
  27. Scardamalia, M., & Bereiter, C. (1994). Computer support for knowledge-building communities. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 3(3), 265-283.
  28. Papert, S. (1980) Mindstorms: Children, computers, and powerful ideas. New York: Basic Books.
  29. Anderson, T. (2008). Towards a theory of online learning. In T. Anderson & F. Elloumi (eds.) Theory and Practice of Online Learning, Chapter 2 (pp. 45-74).
  30. Thompson, R. & Lee, M.J. (2012). Talking with students through screencasting: Experimentations with video feedback to improve student learning. The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. (1). Retrieved from http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/talking-with-students-through-screencasting-experimentations-with-video-feedback-to-improve-student-learning/
  31. Hattie, J. (1999, August). Influences on Student Learning. Inaugural Lecture: Professor of Education. Lecture conducted from Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from: http://growthmindseteaz.org/files/Influencesonstudent2C683_1_.pdf
  32. Khoo, E., Cowie, B. (2011). A framework for developing and implementing an online learning environment. Journal of Open, Flexible, and Distance Learning, 15(1), 47-59.


Further Reading

Bhatt, I. & de Roock, R. (2013). Capturing the sociomateriality of digital literary events. Research in Learning Technologies. 21(21281). http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/rlt.v21.21281

Oehlri, J.A., Piacentine, J., Peters, A., & Nanamaker, B. (2011). “Do Screencasts Really Work? Assessing Student Learning through Instructional Screencasts”. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2011. Retrieved from: http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/conferences/confsandpreconfs/national/2011/papers/do_screencasts_work.pdf

Olson, V. (Author & Producer). (2013, November 25). Screencasting on the iPad for Visible Learning & Teaching. [iTunes U course]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/ca/course/screencasting-for-visible/id765141258

Richards, R. (2012). Screencasting: Exploring a middle school math teacher’s beliefs and practices through the use of multimedia technology. International Journal of Instructional Media, 39(1), 55-67.